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Monthly Archives: September 2010

The Boxer” is the third single from The Chemical Brothers 2005 albumPush the Button, released in early July 2005 (see 2005 in music). The song features The Charlatans lead singer Tim Burgess on vocals. It is notable that it was the first single released by The Chemical Brothers not to peak within the top 40 of the UK Charts. It’s the second Chemical Brothers single to feature Tim Burgess following “Life is Sweet“, which was released 10 years before.



Zeitgeist is “the spirit of the times” or “the spirit of the age.” Zeitgeist is the general cultural, intellectual, ethical, spiritual, and/or political climate within a nation or even specific groups, along with the general ambience, morals, sociocultural direction or mood of an era.

Directed by Peter Joseph. Starring George W. Bush, George Carlin, Osama Bin Laden.

Documentary about:

a) the origin of christian faith

b) how american banks have seized worldpower at the beginning of the 20th century,

c) how these 2 items are related to the wars fought in the 20th and 21st century.

The history of “Zeitgeist: The Movie” is not what many assume. The original Zeitgeist was actually not a “film”, but a performance piece, which consisted of a vaudevillian style multi-media event using recorded music, live instruments and video. The event was given over a 6-night period in New York City and then, without any interest to professionally release or produce the work, was “tossed” up on the Internet arbitrarily. The work was never designed as a film or even a documentary in a traditional sense – it was designed as a creative, provoking, emotionally driven expression, full of artistic extremity and heavily stylized gestures.

However, once online, an unexpected flood of interest began to generate. Within 6 months over 50 Million views were recorded on Google Video counters (before they were reset for some reason). The current combined estimates put the number of Internet views at over 100 million as of 2009.

Banksy is the pseudonym of a prolific British graffiti  artist ,  political activist and painter, whose identity is unconfirmed. His  satirical street  art and subversive epigrams combine irreverent dark humour with graffiti done in a distinctive stencilling technique. Such artistic works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.

Banksy’s work was born out of the Bristol underground scene which involved collaborations between artists and musicians. According to author and graphic designer Tristan Manco, Banksy “was born in 1974 and raised in Bristol, England. The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s.”Observers have noted that his style is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris and members of the anarcho-punk band Crass who maintained a graffiti stencil campaign on the London Tube System in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

” We can’t do anything to change the world until capitalism crumbles. In the meantime we should all go shopping to console ourselves.”

— Banksy, Wall and Piece

Banksy’s works have dealt with an array of political and social themes, including anti-War, anti-capitalism, anti-fascism, anti-imperialism, anti-authoritarianism, anarchism, nihilism, and existentialism. Additionally, the components of the human condition that his works commonly critique are greed, poverty, hypocrisy, boredom, despair, absurdity, and alienation. Although Banksy’s works usually rely on visual imagery and iconography to put forth his message, he has made several politically related comments in his various books. In surmising his list of “people who should be shot”, he listed “Fascist thugs, religious fundamentalists, (and) people who write lists telling you who should be shot.” While facetiously describing his political nature, Banksy declared that “Sometimes I feel so sick at the state of the world, I can’t even finish my second apple pie.

The term Street Art has evolved to define the more visual and engaging aspects of urban art, as opposed to simply text-based graffiti and tagging. This film follows such notorious cult figures as: Blek Le Rat, Nano 4814, Nuria, Sweet Toof, NoNose, and Eine, as they work upon the pavements of Paris Londonand Madrid During the film we pursue these characters as they create new pieces and discuss the varying approaches to Street Art in these three diverse cities.

We also meet some of the artists taking part in the first ever Street Art exhibition at Tate Modern, and explore the rapidly expanding commercial market that’s turning street artists into big earners at the auction houses. What does this newfound profitable aspect mean for this formerly underground and anti-establishment scene?

There Will Be Blood is a 2007 drama film directed, written and co-produced by Paul Thomas Anderson. The film is loosely based on the Upton Sinclair novel, Oil ! (1927). It tells the story of a silver-miner-turned-oil-man on a ruthless quest for wealth during Southern California‘s oil boom of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano.

Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970) is an American film directorscreenwriter, and producer. He has written and directed five feature films: Hard Eight (1996), Boogie Nights (1997),  Magnolia (1999), Punch-Drunk Love (2002) and There Will Be Blood (2007). He has been nominated for five Academy AwardsThere Will Be Blood for Best Achievement in Directing, Best Motion Picture of the Year, and Best Adapted Screenplay; Magnolia for Best Original Screenplay; and  Boogie Nights for Best Original Screenplay.

He’s been hailed as being “one of the most exciting talents to come along in years” and as being “among the supreme talents of today”

TOOL hasn’t licensed its music since 1996, allowed for the inclusion of three of its songs in World Tour as long they were involved with the artwork and tracking of the songs for the game, leading to the creation of the art-like Tool venue created by Adam Jones.

Guitar Hero World Tour is the first game in the Guitar Hero series to feature drum and microphone controllers for percussion and vocal parts, similar in manner to the competing Rock Band series of games. The game allows users to create new songs through the “Music Studio” mode, which can then be uploaded and shared through a service known as “GHTunes”.

The video is completely made through use of CGI, making it Tool’s first full CGI video, as opposed to stop-motion animation, which the band has used in their past videos.

The video was co-directed by guitarist  Adam Jones and artist   Alex Grey and also features creative input from Chet Zar ( American artist notable for his dark visual art, make-up effects, and digital animation).

Adam Thomas Jones (born January 15, 1965) is a three time Grammy Award -winning Welsh-American musician and visual artist, best known for his position as the guitarist for Grammy-Award winning band Tool. Jones has been rated the 75th Greatest Guitarist of all time by the Rolling Stone and placed 9th in Guitar World‘s Top 100 Greatest metal Guitarists.  Jones is regularly credited for a majority of Tool’s music videos.

All of TOOL’s music videos feature stop motion to some extent.

This video in particular attracted much attention. Jones explained that it doesn’t contain a storyline, but that his intentions were to summon personal emotions with its imagery. Rolling Stone described this imagery by stating that, in the video, “evil little men dwell in a dark dungeon with meat coursing through pipes in the wall” and called it a “groundbreaking”, “epic” clip. Billboard voted it “Best Video By A New Artist”.

The movie industry was on the cusp of a technological revolution when paying cinema-goers first donned 3D glasses, in the 1920s. But back then it wasn’t innovation in vision that was to transform the cinema experience forever, but sound. Eighty years on, and following further false dawns in the 1950s and 1960s, 3D is once again film-makers’ gimmick du jour. Are its prospects any better this time around?

First off, Buzz Hays, Sony’s executive stereoscopic 3D producer, is keen to shatter some of the myths that have built up about filming in 3D – myths he thinks have held the medium back.

One of the big myths, says Hays, is that the technology can be as stifling as it is liberating for film-makers. For instance, convention has it that the audience works so hard to focus on the action taking place at a certain depth in a 3D image that average shot length will rise to give them time to adjust, marking the end of the quick cuts between cameras that characterise most modern movies.

Eye strain

It doesn’t have to be that way, he says. The problem emerges when one 3D camera rig uses so-called negative parallax to make the principle characters appear to jump out of the screen, while another rig uses positive parallax to shift the action behind the screen (see diagram, above right).

Hays demonstrated the effect, showing several clips where the focal depth-point shifted starkly between shots – after which the sensation of eye strain was readily apparent. As Hays points out, if the important action is placed at the same apparent depth in both camera feeds, the audience can concentrate on that depth with minimal effort.

Any budding 3D directors should obey what Hays calls the “rule of three” – the depth map of any given shot must be viewed in the context of the depth maps of the shots immediately preceding and following it.

Fortunately for cinematographers, who commonly shoot scenes out of their final order, scene depth can be adjusted to some degree in post-production.

As audiences become more accustomed to the conventions of 3D, forcing them to refocus on characters at different depths may give the action additional atmosphere, says Hays. Just as shaky camera work in a 2D film like Cloverfield can provide an instant sense of unease in an audience, so placing a character in a 3D film uncomfortably close to the audience may hint at an unsavoury nature.

New noir

This subtle use of 3D as a tool to guide the story puts paid to the notion that the technology is a mere gimmick, says Hays. He points to the 2007 film Beowulf as a good example: as characters gain or lose power during the course of the film, they become respectively more or less prominent in the 3D effects.

Some conventions are unlikely to survive a transition from 2D to 3D filming. One is a tendency for cinematographers to use a shallow depth of field to ensure that only characters and objects at a certain depth in the scene are in focus, so guiding the audience’s attention.

Objects at all depths, within reason, should be in focus in 3D films, as is the case in the real world – so movie-makers need to use different techniques to guide the audience’s attention in three dimensions.

Stage plays already provide a solution through the careful use of lighting – an effect likely to be adopted in 3D film-making. So just as the talkies gave way to a period of film noir, perhaps this latest cinematographic innovation will give rise to a whole new wave of moodily lit movies.

The Universe looks like a pretty tranquil place to live, doesn’t it? During the day the sun shines steadily, and at night the heavens are reassuring and unchanging.

Dream on. The Universe is filled to the brim with dangerous, nasty things, all jostling for position to be the one to wipe us off the face of the planet. Happily for us, they’re all pretty unlikely—how many people do you know who have died by proton disintegration?—but if you wait long enough, one of them is bound to get us.

But which one?

Death by Asteroid

Of all the ways we might meet our untimely demise, getting wiped out by an asteroid is the most likely. Why? Because we sit in a cosmic shooting gallery, with 100 tons of material hitting us every day. The problem, though, occurs every few centuries when something big this way comes. If you could ask a dinosaur, I’d imagine they’d tell you to take this seriously.

And we do. The B612 Foundation is a collection of scientists dedicated to making sure we don’t end up with our bones in some future museum. Their advice: no nukes! Instead, slam a spacecraft head-on into a dangerous rock to move it in a hurry, then fine-tune it with another spacecraft by using its gravity to pull the rock into a safe path. It sounds like sci-fi, but models show this is in fact our best bet to save the Earth.

Death by Exploding Star

When a massive star ends its life, it does so with a bang: a supernova, which sends death sleeting across space in the form of high-energy radiation. Numerous studies indicate that a supernova would have to be closer than about 75 light years to do us any harm. The good news: no stars that close are capable of the deed. But in the past things were different; there’s evidence we got caught in a blast 2 to 3 million years ago. Of course, the fact that we’re still here means we survived. And it’ll be some time before another such event occurs. That’s good: there’s not a darn thing we could do about it anyway.

Death by Dying Sun

The sun is kinda important to us; without it, we’d freeze. But the sun is also middle-aged: At 4.5 billion years old, it’s already halfway to running out of fuel, swelling into a red giant, and cooking us to a fine crisp. Even long before then—in less than a billion years—it’ll warm up enough to raise our average temperature and cause a runaway greenhouse effect, boiling our oceans.

Happily, that’s a long time from now. I’ll let my great-great-great-great-great^nth grandchildren worry about it.

Death by Black Hole

Black holes are misunderstood. They don’t wander the galaxy looking for tasty snacks in the form of planets and stars; they orbit the Milky Way just like the hundreds of billions of other stars do. But it’s possible that one could wander too close to us. If it did, planetary orbits would be disrupted, causing the Earth to drop into the sun or be tossed out into deep space. It’s unlikely the black hole would swallow us whole, but given the alternatives it might be a blessing.

Note, though, that any object with lots of mass would be a problem, including normal everyday stars, and they are a lot more common! Given that it could be trillions of years or more before even that happens, we don’t have to worry too much about rogue black holes.

Death by Ennui

All good things must come to an end, and that includes our Universe itself. It’s 13 billion years old, but what will happen in a trillion years? A quintillion? A googol?

That’s a seriously long time from now. By then, all stars will be long dead, and (if modern quantum theory is right, and we’re pretty sure it is) even black holes will have evaporated. Not only that, but matter itself will have fallen apart: protons, long thought to be utterly stable, may disintegrate after about 10 ^39 years. So in that long distant future, the Universe may be nothing more than an ultra-thin soup of electrons and low-energy photons bumping around an eternal nothingness.

And while that’s inevitable, it’s so far in the future it makes the current age of the Universe seem like one beat of a mosquito’s wings. There are certainly more pressing needs to attend to.

My advice? Go outside, look up, enjoy the sun, the moon, and the stars. They may be there forever as far as any one of us is concerned… and forever is a long, long time.

Article by Popular Mechanics  (

A short video on the new 3-D camera technology developed by James Cameron and Vince Pace.

The Fusion Camera System a.k.a. Reality Camera System 1 was designed as a way to shoot features in stereoscopic 3-D. This digital high-definition camera was used on Cameron’s documentaries and movies Aliens of the Deep, Ghosts of the Abyss and Avatar.

Each lens has a different filter , which removes different part of the image as it enters each eye. This gives the brain the illusion it is seeing the picture from two different angles, creating the 3D effect.

Continuing to develop new technology as he went along, Cameron also devised a ‘virtual camera‘, a hand-held monitor that allowed him to move through a 3D terrain.

This, Cameron said, allowed him to create ‘the ultimate immersive media‘, which he anticipates will exceed any and all expectation.

In essence, this allowed Cameron to direct the film as if it was computer game. If he wanted to change the viewpoint, he could click a few buttons on a mouse and a computer would redraw the virtual world from the new perspective.  Suuuupppeeerrr  coool