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Wildstyle is a complicated and intricate form of graffiti. Due to its complexity, it is often very hard to read by people who are not familiar with it. Usually, this form of graffiti incorporates interwoven and overlapping letters and shapes. It may include arrows, spikes, and other decorative elements depending on the technique used. The numerous layers and shapes make this style extremely difficult to produce homogeneously, which is why developing an original style in this field is seen as one of the greatest artistic challenges to a graffiti writer. Wildstyle pieces are also known as “burners”, meaning “hot” as fire. Wildstyles are seen as one of the most complicated and difficult tags and are often used to get an artist’s work seen (rather than to put a political message or any other kind of message across).

 

Pioneers of Wildstyle

The original pioneers of wildstyle were Tracy  168 and Stay High 149, and later such notables as Zephyr and Fate 170 advanced the highly personalized style.

 

 

 

 

Styles of the Wildstyle

Wildstyles commonly include a set of arrows, curves and letters which have been so transformed as to be rendered arcane to the eyes of non-graffiti artists. It has also been common practice to incorporate 3D elements into the pieces, and even transform the whole letter structure into three dimensions, to add to the depth of visual perception of the work. Many artists have different elements to add to their wildstyle that gain that writer a good deal of respect within the graffiti scene, especially if one creates his own style and stays original and creative. Veteran artists tend to go for more complicated forms of wildstyle in which the types are hard to read but broad in creativity. Getting one’s style mastered is key to achieving this success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Style 1983

Wild Style was the first hip hop motion picture. Released theatrically in 1983 by First Run Features and later re-released for home video by Rhino Home Video, the movie was directed by  Charlie Ahearn (director of the feature films Deadly Art of Survival and Fear of Fiction) and featured  Fab Five FreddyLee Quinonesthe Rock Steady CrewThe Cold Crush BrothersPatti AstorSandra Fabara and Grandmaster Flash. The protagonist “Zoro” is played by the legendary New York graffiti artist “Lee” George Quinones. An early version of the ‘Wild Style’ logo appeared in the Fall of 1981 when Charlie Ahearn hired graffiti legend Dondi to paint the ‘window down’ subway car piece that appears in the film . The Dondi piece was the inspiration for the animated title sequence designed by the artist Zephyr in 1982 . The ‘Wild Style’ logo was designed by Zephyr and painted as a huge ‘burner’ mural by Zephyr, Revolt, and Sharp in the Summer of 1983 (3). The film is unique in that many of the actors’ roles were written to express their real-life personalities.


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