Skip navigation

Tag Archives: cinematography

Tips on how to be a successful filmmaker during the recession.

 

What do you do when all the news is bad news? Layoffs, bank collapses, credit constriction. Gloom is the swine flu of our media ecosystem, and it’s hard to ward off infection and hysteria. Our economy’s become a dark, frigid sea that we’re supposed to distance swim without instruction or a shore in sight. So what does that mean for us as creative individuals?

First and foremost, we need to recognize that we have unique resources. The news may be bad, but we started adapting to murky economic realities long before most people ever dreamed of a financial crisis. We’ve evolved for this extreme environment, like those crazy deep-sea fish — the glow-in-the dark ones with lamps on their heads. We may not be pretty, but we know how to survive in dark waters — and now the whole ocean’s gone dark. Everyone else is panicking. They don’t know how to live like this. But those of us used to late-night edit rooms, 20-hour days, Red Bull, ramen and shoebox apartments… we already know how to swim in these waters. We’ve already developed our weird adaptations in order to find work, food and friends, and now we’re at an advantage. While everyone else slows down or stops, we can see clearly and keep creating. While others are blind in the dark, we can be proactive and fearless, and by taking some pretty simple steps we can make major leaps in our work and our careers.

TOP 10 THINGS TO DO IN THE RECESSION:

1. Commit yourself to filmmaking.

First, stop equivocating and commit to the long-term goal of being a filmmaker. You’re either in or you’re out — decide. Then recognize that living day-to-day, throwing everything into the next project without regard for what follows may not work over the long term. It’s a question of pacing. If you still want to be doing this when you’re in your forties, fifties and eighties, then you need to construct a life that functions. Committing to being a filmmaker means making all parts of your life work well.

2. Dedicate yourself to a lifetime of making inventive, rigorous work that matters.

If you’re going to do this for the rest of your life, then you must ask yourself, “What am I making?” Is what you make the best possible thing it can be? Have you done the thinking to bring real artistry to your pursuit?

Commit to rigor over fluff and meaning over flash. The world does not need more predictable fare. The world needs films that share something about our moment; something that cannot be seen in any other way. To be a great filmmaker you must be inventive and rigorous. So swear to yourself that you will be as fearless as possible in pursuit of this goal.

3. Use your creative skills to build your future, not to deny your current situation.

We’ve all heard someone (maybe even ourselves?) spin fantasies about “how it’ll all work out.” That financier, that funder and even Mom, in a pinch. Someone’s coming to make it right. They’ll fix our financial mess for us, and we can ignore life’s harsher realities till that white knight arrives. But unless there is a trust fund on your horizon, this is creative fiction. And while your ability to weave creative fiction may serve you professionally, it will hold you back in your actual life. There is no buyer, funder or producer that is going to save you. You only have yourself. So decide to use your creative skills to build your way forward through the challenges. Instead of using your creative imagination to deny that things are hard or to ignore reality, learn from past mistakes and do not repeat them. You need to be able to look at your life, banish fear and say with unshakable confidence “I’ve got a new plan.”

4. Spend with clarity and save with purpose.

Why is it that when someone says, “You can’t make that movie,” you think, “Yes, I can,” and if they say, “You should have some savings,” you say, “There is no way.” Recognize that you are skilled at making a lot happen with little money and use that skill on your work and your life. You’re a filmmaker, you know how to build real things from no resources. With planning and forethought you can both make your movie and slowly build up savings.

Be ruthless about the difference between what you want and what you need. Track your money, making sure you’re spending it well and prioritizing things that really matter. The goal is to save. Set a target savings amount. If you can, buy only what you need and barter for whatever else you want. Use eBay and Craigslist for bargains on all those weird little things you cannot live without.

For your films, be clear that big movies need big partners. If deep-pocketed partners aren’t in your future, you need to change your “at any cost” strategy. Narrative filmmakers may need to embrace the era of the small movie: small containable scripts, few locations, small crew. You also may need to deepen and wield your knowledge about local and international tax credits. Both narrative and documentary filmmakers need to really research the grant landscape and be realistic about the odds of receiving funding.

Also don’t be afraid to slow down your schedule to benefit your work and your pocketbook (remember everyone is adjusting — no one will blink at a schedule change). A slower pace means you can fit your film around your money job and use the extra time to keep on solid financial footing and deepen the work. Keeping your money job allows you to move forward without falling too far behind. However if your film is topical in a way that means it must be shot right now, then you need to really know how much cash it will take to make it happen.

So be realistic and clear about how much your film will cost and which funding sources are likely and which are not. Make a plan for what you will do if none of the funding comes through. Next, make a plan for if half comes through. Your goal is to understand how much debt you can take on. Be realistic about this part and set a limit before you start shooting. It’s important to know the answer to this in advance because during the crunch you can easily lose sight and get into trouble. You need to be honest with yourself — you may not sell this film. The debt you are accruing is yours and yours alone. Having a clear sense of this in advance can really help you make strong choices during production and post and could mean the difference between long-term debt obligations and solvency.

5. Get your credit in order.

Remember that access to capital when you need it is good but bad debt can sink you. So if you have debt, commit to eliminating it: Figure out how much you owe, figure out what your upcoming costs will be and determine how much you can realistically spend each month to pay down your debt. Three good online debt resources are Snowball down your debt,  the smart money resources, and powerpay.

For those of you with no credit, you can establish credit by joining a local or national credit union and obtaining a debit card that you can then trade up for a credit union charge card.

Either way, dedicate yourself to raising your credit/FICO score. Use resources like the Filmmaker article from Spring 2009 to assist you so you have the credit resources you need when you need them.

6. Embrace multiple income streams.

Other forms of income make your work possible. Instead of fighting this, be grateful. It’s amazing how much energy you save if you stop fighting this paradigm. If you need more money, find new sources of income based on your odd skill-set and apply No. 3. If your job is demeaning or bad, commit to finding a new job and leaving your old one. But remember that this is a recession. Don’t just up and quit your day job. You might not find another one as easily. And frankly, your day job is keeping your movie happening even though it feels counterintuitive. Sure, you may need to make adjustments to keep your second (or third or fourth) job from interfering completely with your film, but it’s likely necessary to keep you moving ahead financially in these times. By first adjusting your attitude you greatly improve your chances of making the whole thing work.

7Create strength through community.

Your friends and colleagues are your greatest resources — they have skills, equipment, intelligence and savvy. Clues to survival reside with our peers and our community of fellow filmmakers and artists. The choices they make will help us solve our own problems and make better choices. Take colleagues you admire out to coffee, lunch or dinner, and ask questions about how they make it work. Also, do things that help you enjoy your community. Too often in the single-minded pursuit of filmmaking we forget to enjoy our friends. Movies get made by groups of people. Make sure that this group brings you joy. Communal dinners, caffeinated meet-ups, tequila. These are all tools to bring folks closer together, and the better we play together, the better we work together.

8Manage your goals and chart your progress.

Set your goals in writing. Studies show that writing down your goals drastically improves your chances of meeting them. Break down the steps. Any goal, even a big one, is achievable if you break it down into the smallest steps possible. Then share your goals. Make yourself accountable publicly so that you have an incentive to follow through on things like debt reduction. Also, track and share your success. Use the discipline of goal tracking to bring order to your life. Then use the lists to remind yourself that you are making progress. It’s too easy to think you aren’t moving forward if your goals are really big, but progress is progress, so make sure you can chart yours.

9Give more and participate in making the world a better place for all people.

When you focus on your own challenges it’s easy to forget that the world is a difficult and challenging place for those less fortunate than yourself. Don’t be a selfish artist, be a good citizen. Volunteer for a cause, a campaign or a soup kitchen. Help your friend or neighbor. Give advice, give your time, give your expertise. Especially do this when you’re afraid. It will banish the fear. It will also lead you to new and unexpected opportunities. And remember, even when it’s hard, we are blessed to be able to do what we love.

10Make the decision to make your best work and be good with money and enrich the world.

Now go out there and kick some cinema booty.

 

 

Article by  Esther B. Robinson

 

Filmmakermagazine

Advertisements

Seven Nation Army” is the first track on the album  Elephant by American alternative rock band  The White Stripes. It was released as a single in 2003. Seven Nation Army reached #1 on the Modern Rock Tracks for three weeks and won 2004’s Grammy Award for Best Rock Song. The song is known for its underlying riff, which plays throughout most of the song. Although it sounds like a bass guitar (an instrument the group had famously never previously used), the sound is actually created by running Jack White‘s semi-acoustic guitar (a 1950s style Kay Hollowbody) through a Digitech Whammy pedal set down an octave. The riff was composed at a sound check before a show at the Corner Hotel in MelbourneAustralia, according to the set notes in the booklet which accompanied the Under Blackpool Lights DVD. This riff was inspired by the main theme of Anton Bruckner‘s Fifth symphony.

According to White, “Seven Nation Army” is what he used to call the  Salvation Army as a child.

In March 2005, Q magazine placed “Seven Nation Army” at number 8 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks. In September 2005, NME placed “Seven Nation Army” at number 5 in its list of the 50 Greatest Tracks Of The Decade. It was also called the 75th greatest hard rock song by VH1. In May 2008,Rolling Stone placed this song at number 21 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time. The song was named the 75th best hard rock song of all time by VH1. “Seven Nation Army” also earned 20th place in Triple J‘s Hottest 100 of All Time in 2009. The song was also listed at #30 on Pitchfork Media‘s top 500 songs of the 2000s, and at number 2 in Observer Music Monthly‘s top 75 songs of the decade, behind Beyoncé‘s “Crazy in Love“. It also came in second on Channel V Australia’s top 1000 songs of the 00s. In 2009, US website Consequence of Sound named this as their top rock track of the 2000s, as did Boston’sWFNX Radio. On Rolling Stone’s updated version of their The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, “Seven Nation Army” was listed at number 286. It was also ranked #1 onRhapsody‘s list of the Top 100 Tracks of the Decade.

The song is also very popular in European football stadiums even becoming the anthem of the the Italians’ world cup win in 2006 and of the Euro 2008.5

Directed by Alex & Martin

whitestripess.com

xlrecordings.com

Directed by: Paul B. Cummings & Tony Fiandaca

Tony vs Paul info and FAQs:

A stop motion battle between two friends turned enemies.

FAQ’s

1. The video took two months to film and edit.

2. The music is available here:
http://www.myspace.com/christopherlee…

3. Nothing is fake and no green screens were used. The only computer animated part was the letters falling on the page.

4. Yes, we really did jump all those times.

5. I edited it with Final Cut Pro

6. The camera we used was a Canon GL1 with both digital stills being taken, and footage being shot.

7. It was filmed in Massachusetts in the following towns: Arlington, Medford, Upton, Gloucester

8. There are 4,000+ still shots in the video.

rate & leave comments on imdb:
http://imdb.com/title/tt1029391/

Written & Directed by: Paul Cummings & Tony Fiandaca
Starring: Paul Cummings & Tony Fiandaca
Edited by: Paul Cummings
Music by: Chris Donovan

There Will Be Blood is a 2007 drama film directed, written and co-produced by Paul Thomas Anderson. The film is loosely based on the Upton Sinclair novel, Oil ! (1927). It tells the story of a silver-miner-turned-oil-man on a ruthless quest for wealth during Southern California‘s oil boom of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano.

Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970) is an American film directorscreenwriter, and producer. He has written and directed five feature films: Hard Eight (1996), Boogie Nights (1997),  Magnolia (1999), Punch-Drunk Love (2002) and There Will Be Blood (2007). He has been nominated for five Academy AwardsThere Will Be Blood for Best Achievement in Directing, Best Motion Picture of the Year, and Best Adapted Screenplay; Magnolia for Best Original Screenplay; and  Boogie Nights for Best Original Screenplay.

He’s been hailed as being “one of the most exciting talents to come along in years” and as being “among the supreme talents of today”

Adam Thomas Jones (born January 15, 1965) is a three time Grammy Award -winning Welsh-American musician and visual artist, best known for his position as the guitarist for Grammy-Award winning band Tool. Jones has been rated the 75th Greatest Guitarist of all time by the Rolling Stone and placed 9th in Guitar World‘s Top 100 Greatest metal Guitarists.  Jones is regularly credited for a majority of Tool’s music videos.

All of TOOL’s music videos feature stop motion to some extent.

This video in particular attracted much attention. Jones explained that it doesn’t contain a storyline, but that his intentions were to summon personal emotions with its imagery. Rolling Stone described this imagery by stating that, in the video, “evil little men dwell in a dark dungeon with meat coursing through pipes in the wall” and called it a “groundbreaking”, “epic” clip. Billboard voted it “Best Video By A New Artist”.

A short video on the new 3-D camera technology developed by James Cameron and Vince Pace.

The Fusion Camera System a.k.a. Reality Camera System 1 was designed as a way to shoot features in stereoscopic 3-D. This digital high-definition camera was used on Cameron’s documentaries and movies Aliens of the Deep, Ghosts of the Abyss and Avatar.

Each lens has a different filter , which removes different part of the image as it enters each eye. This gives the brain the illusion it is seeing the picture from two different angles, creating the 3D effect.

Continuing to develop new technology as he went along, Cameron also devised a ‘virtual camera‘, a hand-held monitor that allowed him to move through a 3D terrain.

This, Cameron said, allowed him to create ‘the ultimate immersive media‘, which he anticipates will exceed any and all expectation.

In essence, this allowed Cameron to direct the film as if it was computer game. If he wanted to change the viewpoint, he could click a few buttons on a mouse and a computer would redraw the virtual world from the new perspective.  Suuuupppeeerrr  coool


Nothing in the world is more flexible and yielding than water.

Procure multimedia production

Rider: Nic Burton Moore ( Junior World Champion 2004 )

Filmed: Wilhelm Rabie ( Procure multimedia )

Edited: Wilhelm Rabie  ( Procure Multimedia )

Water is life’s mater and matrix, mother and medium. There is no life without water.



Eddie Rasta is another positive story in ‘ Stiek uit, jou bang ding! ‘. From the infamous ganglands of the Cape Flats, Procure multimedia brings you a Community uplifting TV show, that aims to help, promote and highlight the people making a difference in the less privileged communities of Cape Town South Africa.

Eddie Rasta is an inspiration to many kids in his community where he and his family has created a safe haven in the middle of the gang stricken Elsies Rivier. Eddie teaches kids about car mechanics and shows them there’s another way other than gangsterism.

“So sit stil en hou vas, en laat die show jou verras!”

Procure multimedia has a contract with CTV ( Cape Town Local Community TV channel) for prime time ( 19:00 – 19:30 ) Plus 2 reruns. ‘Stiek uit’ will also be aired on Soweto TV ( DSTV ) by next year.  We still have advertising and different sponsorship spots available before we can create our dream.            To be apart and market directly to this geographic market contact Euvrard Loubser at +27 (0)72 408 8000 or alternatively mail loubserdigital@gmail.com

To change the world all you need is a vision

Created by: Procure Multimedia
Concept: Wilhelm Rabie,  Simean February and Euvrard Loubser
Camera Operator: Euvrard Loubser, Wilhem Rabie
Editor: Wilhelm Rabie and Euvrard Loubser
Sound: Simean February , Mad Production
Graphic: Ismael Grant

Film by Ty Evans and Spike JonzeYeah Right! is notable for its soundtrack, length, and the extensive use of never-before-seen (in a skateboarding video) special effects.

The introduction credits for the video feature a unique series of shots in ultra-slow motion, filmed with Jonze’s personal camera that is capable of shooting 100 frames per second. The camera is low to the ground and very close to the skateboarder as various flip tricks are completed.

directed by Ty Evans and Spike JonzeYeah Right! is notable for its soundtrack, length, and the extensive use of never-before-seen (in a skateboarding video) special effects.

Spike Jonze is also part owner of skateboard company Girl Skateboards with riders Rick Howard and Mike Carroll.

He is best known for his collaborations with writer  Charlie Kaufman, which include the 1999 film  Being John Malkovich and the 2002 film Adaptation. , and for his work as director of the 2009 film  Where the Wild Things Ar  e. He is also credited as a co-creator of MTV‘s  Jackass

Naqoyqatsi focuses on society’s transition from a natural environment to a technology-based industrial environment. The name of the film is a Hopi word (written properly as naqö̀yqatsi) meaning “life as war”. In contrast to the first two parts, 80% of Naqoyqatsi was created from archive footage and stock images, manipulated and processed digitally on non-linear editing (non-sequential) workstations and intercut with specially-produced  CGI.

It is the third and final film of the 1983-2002  Qatsi trilogy written, directed, and produced by  Godfrey Reggio. The three films of the trilogy have musical scores by composer Philip Glass, but no commentary or speech. The music is more in the traditional orchestral tradition than much of Glass’s work as a familiar doorway to images so disconnected from the familiar world. One instrument, the cello played byYo-Yo Ma, plays a single line running through the entire piece. Some unconventional instruments are used in addition to traditional ones, including a didgeridoo and an electronically-created Jew’s harp.

Pay attention to the first image that opens the film; it’s a painting done in 1563 of The “Little” Tower of Babel, by Pieter Brueghel the Elder with a great significance in the narative sequence of the documentary.

ART OF CINEMATOGRAPHY